Impressions of the different jobs in automotive service and suggestions on training leading to entrance and to advancement in the trade.
Views of an ancient car, contrasted with scenes on busy streets and highways, illustrate the commentator’s statement that with the growth of the automobile industry has come an increased demand for skilled automobile workmen. A mechanic replaces a camshaft, and grinds valves on an L-head and a valve-in-head engine as the commentator points out that in engine repair the tradesman must keep informed of new developments. Another mechanic works on a metal lathe as the commentator says that sometimes parts must be made in the shop. Still another mechanic welds a broken fender. An automotive electrician tests a coil. Other adjustments that the automotive serviceman is called upon to make are indicated by views of mechanics adjusting brakes, repairing an ignition switch, checking wheel alignment, and soldering a leaky radiator. Specialists in automotive service are indicated by views of an engine repair shop, fender and body shop, battery and electric shop, and brake and wheel alignment shop. The commentator says that in large garages there are opportunities for advancement for those who have technical knowledge, skill, and ability to meet the public. A salesman is shown talking to a prospective buyer as the commentator says that mechanics who become salesmen benefit from their knowledge of the operation of the motorcar.
The next sequence is on training for entrance and advancement in automotive service. Jobs open to beginners are suggested by views of a mechanic’s helper and a worker in a parts department. The commentator emphasizes the importance of study for the man trying to advance in automotive service. Some training and study plans are suggested: service manuals, motion pictures, night school courses, trade schools, and correspondence courses.
The final sequence deals with opportunities for high school training for automotive service. A physics class studies the principles of the gas engine. In a mathematics class students work a problem in horsepower. The commentator emphasizes the importance of taking all the mathematics possible in high school. Views of classes in mechanical drawing and of automotive and machine shops are accompanied by brief commentary descriptions of the contributions of each to the training of the prospective automotive worker. Views of shop managers and mechanics at work and of an automobile assembly line are shown as the commentator says that with the steadily increasing output of motor vehicles there is considerable demand for automobile servicemen.

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